Individual Actions

Things that homeowners and community members can do to protect clean water

Becoming More Familiar with Flood Risk in Your Community!

Author: Jake Peters Due to its unique combination of geologic and hydrologic features, Middle Tennessee has long been at an elevated risk for flooding. Traditionally, the public is informed of these dangers through flood maps provided by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), a group that works to provide federal assistance in the event of…

HC Hosts Another Successful Conservation Conversation

Harpeth Conservancy hosted its third Conservation Conversation, a monthly online educational series with experts answering your questions, on Wednesday, May 24, 2020. This month’s topic was Ensuring Environmental Equity: Public Participation in Governmental Decision-Making in the Pandemic Era. A panel of experts including Dr. G.S. Hans Director of the Stanton Foundation First Amendment Clinic at…

Retrospective on May 2010 Flood

10 Years After the Historic May 2010 Flood “The Waterway Flood Recovery Project:  2010-2012 and Embracing the New Normal of More Extreme Weather” Retrospective by Dorene Bolze, President and CEO April 30, 2020 See our Water Flood Recovery Project page for details and photos. It is the 10th anniversary of the historic May 2010 flood that hit the greater Nashville region…

AmeriCorps Members Serve HC and the Community

(L-R) AmeriCorps members Lily Sronkoski with Plant the Seed and Kaitin Liphart with Richland Creek Watershed Alliance provide tornado relief with Harpeth Conservancy Americorps members Haley Tucker and Meriweather Bean. Three HC AmeriCorps members deployed for tornado recovery Harpeth Conservancy is grateful to currently have three AmeriCorps members, who provide mission focused administrative support, volunteer…

Preserving Rural and Agricultural Land-A Core Focus of Harpeth Conservancy

“The risk of losing Middle Tennessee’s iconic rural lands, agricultural production, and scenic landscapes is very real and is affecting all drinking water supplies and water quality” (The Tennessean, May 17, 2018 Cover Story). Rural land is rapidly disappearing in middle Tennessee—regional planning is needed to preserve our rich history, farmland, waterways, and clean water, not to mention alleviate…

Support the Williamson County Land Use Plan

Contact Mayor Rogers Anderson, County Commissioners and the Planning Commission to THANK THEM for Adopting the Plan   UPDATE:  Historic Votes in early March 2020! County Commission Votes to Endorse the Plan at Monday’s meeting:  20-1!   (March 9, 2020) Press on County Commission Vote:  Tennessean, Williamson Herald.    Planning Commission Votes 8-2 to Adopt the Plan!  (March 12,…